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Subject:

Re: Shark Tagging Methods

From:

Lee Miles <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Mon, 22 Apr 2002 22:40:33 EAST

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text/plain

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David,

Have you considered T-bar anchor tags through the dorsal fin. They are
similar to clothing label tags (small plastic stem with "T" piece on one
end and a coloured cyclinder with a number on the other end. They're
available in various colours & sizes from Hallprint Pty Ltd of South
Australia.

Lee Miles B.Sc. (Hon)
PhD Candidate
University of Tasmania
School of Zoology

On Mon, 22 Apr 2002 11:25:07 +1000 David Powter wrote:

> List members,
>
> I am researching the Port Jackson shark, Heterodontus portusjackoni, at
> the University of Newcastle (Australia) and am trying to get some
> advice/suggestions on the best method of tagging them. Port Jacksons
> are a
> small shark growing to a maximum length of 1.65m and are found on the
> shallow coastal reefs of southern Australia during our winter months.
> During these times they mate and deposit their egg cases in rocky
> crevices. They are a bottom dwelling species that is largely
> inactive during
> the day and is readily approached and handled by divers. It appears
> that adult females may migrate up to 800km between their winter breeding
> and summer grounds.
>
> The tagging programme being considered will involve volunteer SCUBA
> divers with limited training, but experience in diving with Port Jackson
> sharks. One method of tagging proposed involves the use of caudal
> peduncle tags. The tags consist of a cattle ear type tag attached to a
> seawater resistant nylon cable tie which is attached around the caudal
> peduncle, leaving 1-2cm of slack. This method is simple for untrained
> divers, but some concerns have been raised about the tags damaging the
> caudal peduncle and caudal fin. I'm interested in any
> information/views on
> this.
>
> Also, I'm seeking suggestions for other methods of tagging these sharks
> underwater that would be simple for untrained, but recreationally
> competent SCUBA divers. The sharks are generally easy to handle
> underwater
> and pose little, if any, risk to divers.
>
> Please reply directly to me at [log in to unmask] and I'll provide
> summarised information for anyone that's interested upon request.
>
> Thanks,
>
> David Powter
>
> School of Applied Sciences, University of Newcastle.
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
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