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Subject: CRS Summary - Part 2
From: Aldo-Pier Solari <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Academic forum on fisheries ecology and related topics <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Tue, 1 Apr 1997 03:54:19 GMT
Content-Type:text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
Parts/Attachments

text/plain (304 lines)


Date: Mon, 31 Mar 1997 08:10:45 -0500
From: Kate Wing <[log in to unmask]>

Russian  Crab  Quotas  Reduced.   In  early  March  1997, Russian
Fisheries Commission  Chairman  Alexander  Rodin  announced  that
Pacific  crab  harvest  quotas were being reduced to about 1/3 of
former quotas due to  population  damage from chemical pollution.
Japanese and American harvests were  likely  to  be  dramatically
reduced.  [Interfax]

Royal  Seafoods,  Seattle.  In early March 1997, officials of RGI
Seafoods   Inc.    announced   that   the   company   will  cease
manufacturing by its Royal Seafoods subsidiary  in  Seattle,  WA,
and will more all operations to Frionor USA Inc.  in New Bedford,
MA, no later than May 31, 1997.  [Dow Jones News]

Coral.  On Mar.  5, 1997, Australian scientists, using underwater
lasers  to  measure  coral growth, reported in Nature that corals
grow mostly at night.   {On  Mar.   26,  1997, the World Wildlife
Fund for Nature (WWF) released a report on coral reefs citing the
potential for coral extinction  due  to  their  vulnerability  to
harmful effects of global warming.  The report indicates 60 major
instances  of  coral  bleaching  occurred  between 1979 and 1990,
compared to only 3  recorded  cases  in  the previous 103 years.}
[Reuters, Dow Jones News]

Louisiana Gillnets.  On Mar.  5, 1997, U.S.  District Court Judge
Thomas Porteous Jr.  ruled that, before a pending federal lawsuit
challenging LA's ban on gillnets  can  be  heard,  review  of  an
earlier-filed  but  similar state court lawsuit on appeal must be
completed.  The gillnet ban  took  effect  on Mar.  1, 1997.  {On
Mar.  26, 1997, the LA Seafood Management Council  and  LA  Chefs
for  LA  Seafood  released  a  survey of LA resident attitudes on
gillnet  use  by  commercial  fishermen.   Sport  fishing  groups
attacked the validity of the survey, charging that biased wording
of questions influenced the survey outcome.} [Assoc Press]

Bluefin Tuna.  On  Mar.   4,  1997,  NMFS  published new proposed
regulations in the Federal Register for the Atlantic bluefin tuna
fishery.  The proposed  regulations  would  prohibit  fishing  on
certain  days,  would  require anglers report catches in a timely
manner, would provide catch  subquotas  for northern and southern
fisheries, would provide for a  new  permit  system  with  annual
permit renewal and collection of fees, and would prohibit spotter
aircraft  for  all but the purse seine fishery.  A series of four
public hearings on the proposal  will  be held along the Atlantic
coast between Mar.  18-27, with all  comment  due  by  Mar.   31,
1997.  [personal communication, Federal Register, Assoc Press]

EU  Threatens  Japan with WTO Action.  On Mar.  4, 1997, Japanese
officials reported that the  European  Union  threatens to file a
World Trade Organization (WTO) dispute case  if  Japan  does  not
increase  its  imports  of  8  marine  products - mackerel, horse
mackerel, saury,  sardines,  yellowtail,  scallops, scallop meat,
and codfish.  Japan believes  WTO  exceptions  allow  it  to  set
maximum  import  amounts  for  species  whose  domestic  catch is
limited.  [Tokyo Kyodo via Foreign Broadcast Information Service]

Marine Biotechnology Briefing.   On  Mar.   3, 1997, the National
Sea  Grant  Program  held   an   all-day   briefing   on   marine
biotechnology  at  the  Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC.  Three
panels (fisheries, aquaculture,  and seafood safety; bio-medicine
and pharmaceuticals  from  marine  natural  products;  and  water
quality  -  bioremediation  and habitat restoration) will feature
presentations by  12  scientists.   [National  Sea  Grant College
Program announcement]

Swordfish Limited Access.   On  Mar.   3,  1997,  NMFS  published
proposed   regulations  in  the  Federal  Register  amending  the
Atlantic swordfish fishery management plan to establish a limited
access  program  for   the   Atlantic   swordfish  fishery,  with
eligibility criteria based upon historical participation  in  the
fishery.    Limited   entry  permits  would  be  transferable  in
restricted circumstances related to vessel replacement.  A series
of 12 public hearings  is  scheduled  along the Atlantic and Gulf
coasts and in the Caribbean between Mar.  21 and Apr.   28,  with
Apr.  28, 1997, being the deadline for public comment.  [personal
communication]

Japanese  Sardine  Decline.   On  Mar.  1, 1997, Japanese fishing
industry officials reported that, due  to a severe decline in the
harvest of sardines by Japanese fishermen, sardines  for  canning
are  being imported from the United States and Mexico.  The price
of sardines in  Japan  has  increased  substantially.  [Dow Jones
News]

U.S.-Russia Maritime Boundary  and  Pollock.   In  late  February
1997,  Russia  requested  that  the United States allow Russia to
harvest as much as 10% of the U.S.  pollock quota (150,000 metric
tons) in the Bering Sea in exchange for Russian ratification of a
1990  U.S.-Russian  Maritime  Boundary  Agreement.   Although the
Agreement was ratified by the U.S.  Senate on Sept.  16, 1991, no
action was taken by the former Soviet Union before it  collapsed.
U.S.    and   Russian   negotiators  are  scheduled  to  meet  in
Petropavlovsk in April  1997  to  consider  a U.S.  counteroffer,
that could involve increased cooperation  in  U.S.   and  Russian
management  of  the Bering Sea pollock fishery.  If the Agreement
is not ratified by Russia,  U.S.  managers fear increased Russian
pollock harvests in a disputed area that the 1990  Agreement  had
transferred  to  U.S.   jurisdiction, where the United States has
managed the pollock fishery for 6 years.  [Assoc Press]

Japanese Oil Spill.   On  Feb.   25,  1997,  the Japanese federal
government decided to reimburse half the estimated 4 billion  Yen
that  coastal  municipalities spent for oil spill cleanup.  Total
federal,  local,  and  private   expenditures  for  cleanup  were
estimated to be about 17.8 billion Yen.  At the  opening  of  the
13th  session  of the Russian-Japanese Commission on Fisheries in
Moscow on Mar.   3,  1997,  Japanese  officials reported that the
Jan.  2, 1997 Nakhodka fuel oil spill had inflicted heavy  damage
to Japan's fisheries.  On Mar.  17, 1997, the National Federation
of  Fisheries  Cooperative  Associations  filed  claims  for  2.3
billion  Yen  with  the  International Oil Pollution Compensation
Fund (London) for compensation  for  oil  spill cleanup costs.  A
second filing is planned to cover compensation for actual damages
to the fishing industry.   [Interfax,  Tokyo  Kyodo  via  Foreign
Broadcast Information Service, Dow Jones News]

Salmon Along the Pacific Coast

1995  Biological  Opinion  Lawsuit.   On  Mar.   31,  1997,  oral
arguments  are scheduled in U.S.  District Court in Portland, OR,
on the 1995  lawsuit  by  American  Rivers,  the Sierra Club, and
others against NMFS challenging  implementation  of  NMFS's  1995
biological  opinion on operation of the Columbia River hydropower
system.  [NW Fishletter No.  30]

{IDAHO'S 1997 SALMON PLAN.  ON  MAR.   27, 1997, ID GOVERNOR PHIL
BATT RELEASED THE STATE'S 1997 STRATEGY  FOR  SALMON  MANAGEMENT,
RELYING  ON  HEAVY  SPRING  RUNOFF  TO CARRY MOST JUVENILE SALMON
DOWNSTREAM AND MINIMIZING THE USE OF BARGES.  WHEN THE FLOW IS AT
LEAST 100,000 CUBIC FEET  PER  SECOND  AT  LOWER GRANITE DAM, THE
STRATEGY RECOMMENDS THAT  ONLY  ONE-THIRD  OF  THE  JUVENILES  BE
BARGED.   THE  STRATEGY  RECOMMENDS AGAINST USING RESERVOIR WATER
FROM THE CLEARWATER RIVER  BASIN  OR  FROM  THE SNAKE RIVER ABOVE
HELL'S CANYON TO BENEFIT FALL CHINOOK SALMON.} [ASSOC PRESS]

{WA SALMON REPORT.  ON MAR.  27, 1997, THE WA DEPT.  OF FISH  AND
WILDLIFE  RELEASED  A DRAFT REPORT ON RESTORATION OF WILD SALMON.
THE REPORT RECOMMENDED A SEPARATE MANAGEMENT OF WILD AND HATCHERY
SALMON, ADOPTION AND ENFORCEMENT OF REGULATIONS TO BETTER CONTROL
CATASTROPHIC FLOODS THAT  DAMAGE  SPAWNING  AREAS, ENFORCEMENT OF
LAWS REQUIRING PROPER CULVERTS AND OTHER POTENTIAL  OBSTACLES  TO
SALMON  MIGRATION,  GIVING  ESCAPEMENT FOR SPAWNING PRIORITY OVER
HARVEST.  TEN PUBLIC HEARINGS  ARE  SCHEDULED  TO BE CONDUCTED ON
THE DRAFT DURING APRIL AND MAY, WITH A  REVISED  VERSION  OF  THE
DRAFT  TO  BE ACTED UPON BY THE WA FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSION.}
[ASSOC PRESS]

Umpqua  River  Cutthroat  Trout.   By  Mar.   25,  1997,  NMFS is
scheduled to release an opinion on whether  construction  of  the
$43  million  Milltown  Hill Dam, on Elk Creek near Yoncalla, OR,
could harm the endangered Umpqua  River cutthroat trout.  The dam
would block fish migration as well as destroy as much as 18 miles
of stream habitat for trout and salmon.  On  Mar.   10,  1997,  a
coalition  of sport and commercial fishing groups filed notice in
U.S.  District Court  of  their  intent  to  sue NMFS for alleged
failure to protect Umpqua River cutthroat trout adequately  after
they  were listed as endangered.  These groups are concerned that
NMFS  has  not  designated  critical  habitat  for  this species.
[Assoc Press]

Dam Operation Lawsuits.  On Mar.  20,  1997,  a  coalition  of  8
fishing  and  environmental  groups  (including the Pacific Coast
Federation of Fishermen's  Associations,  Trout Unlimited, Sierra
Club,  American  Rivers,  and  others)  notified  the  Bureau  of
Reclamation of their intent  to  sue  the  agency  for  allegedly
failing  to  take  sufficient action to manage irrigation and dam
operations to  protect  Snake  River  salmon.   These groups also
filed a notice of intent to sue  the  Federal  Energy  Regulatory
Commission  (FERC)  for  allegedly  failing  to ensure that Idaho
Power Co.  Dams did  not  jeopardize  migrating salmon.  {ON MAR.
26, 1997, THE  COLUMBIA  RIVER  ALLIANCE  (REPRESENTING  ELECTRIC
UTILITIES,  BARGE  OPERATORS,  AND  IRRIGATORS) FILED A NOTICE OF
INTENT TO SUE NMFS, THE  ARMY  CORPS  OF ENGINEERS, THE BUREAU OF
RECLAMATION, AND BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION  OVER  EQUITABLE
CONSIDERATION  FOR  THE  ECONOMIC  ASPECTS  OF IRRIGATION AND DAM
OPERATIONS.} [Assoc Press]

Northwest Forest Plan.   On  Mar.   18,  1997,  NMFS endorsed the
Clinton Administration's Northwest Forest Plan for  U.S.   Forest
Service  and  Bureau  of  Land  Management  federal  lands  as an
excellent anchor for  salmon  recovery  efforts  in Oregon.  This
conclusion will allow NMFS to streamline consultation on  federal
projects   potentially  affecting  species  protected  under  the
Endangered Species Act.  [Assoc Press]

March 1996 Salmon Suit.  On Mar.  17, 1997, Federal Judge Malcolm
Marsh is scheduled to  hear  arguments  on the March 1996 lawsuit
wherein tribal  and  environmental  groups  allege  that  federal
managers  are  too slow and unfocused in pursuing salmon recovery
measures.  [Assoc Press]

OR Coho  Salmon  Recovery  Plan.   In  mid-March  1997,  OR state
legislators revised their funding  proposal  for  the  Governor's
salmon  recovery  plan,  guaranteeing the first $15 million while
providing the remaining $15  million  contingent upon the federal
government not listing central and northern OR coastal coho under
the Endangered Species Act.  On Mar.  17, 1997, the OR chapter of
the American Fisheries Society  (AFS)  wrote  a  letter  to  NMFS
expressing  concerns  that the governor's coho salmon restoration
plan does not provide  necessary  guidance or strength to recover
coho salmon.   AFS  questioned  the  assumptions  of  the  plan's
habitat  model, reliance on Oregon logging regulations to protect
salmon  habitat,  and  the  absence  of  changes  in agricultural
practices such as grazing.  On Mar.  18, 1997, the OR House voted
56-2 to approve the state's coho salmon recovery plan and  a  $30
million  funding  program using the state general fund if private
funding is  unavailable.   [Assoc  Press,  Portland Oregonian via
Greenwire]

1997 Pacific Salmon Fishery.   On  Mar.   7,  1997,  the  Pacific
Fishery  Management  Council  adopted  4  options,  including one
providing no non-Indian salmon  fishing  off  the coast of WA and
northern OR, for Mar.  31-Apr.  1 public hearings on managing the
1997 salmon season.  Other options would allow limited commercial
and sport fishing for coho  and  chinook  salmon.   For  the  3rd
consecutive  year,  no  coho  salmon fishing would be allowed off
most of OR and all of  CA.   The  Council will decide among the 4
options at meetings to be held Apr.  7-11, 1997, in Millbrae, CA.
[Assoc Press]

WA Timberlands Habitat Conservation Plan.  On Mar.  6, 1997,  the
WA  State Supreme Court refused to reinstate a lawsuit seeking to
block WA from implementing  a  habitat conservation plan covering
1.63 million acres of state timberland.  [Assoc Press]

Canada-Australia  WTO  Dispute.   On  Mar.   5,  1997,   Canadian
officials  announced that they would make a formal request to the
World Trade  Organization's  (WTO's)  Dispute  Settlement Body on
Mar.  20, 1997, that a dispute panel be convened on the issue  of
Australia's ban on imports of uncooked salmon.  [Dow Jones News]

AK  Salmon  Marketing  Proposals.   On Mar.  5, 1997, AK Governor
Tony Knowles  announced  two  legislative  proposals  to increase
markets for AK salmon -- 1) loans of as much as $100,000 would be
available to fishermen who desire to market their own  fish,  and
2)  seafood  plants  would  be  excused  from as much as half the
state's raw-fish tax normally paid  on salmon processed and could
match the tax savings with their own money for  salmon  marketing
or  new  processing equipment for innovative salmon products.  In
mid-March 1997,  the  State  of  Alaska  released  a  report of a
January 1997 meeting on proposals to help market AK salmon.   The
report  stated  that the AK Dept.  of Fish and Game would include
peak  fish  quality  as  a  criteria  for  timing  salmon harvest
periods, and that the Dept.  of Commerce and Economic Development
would work with the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute to develop
a quality grading scale.  In addition, state officials would ease
the  inspection  schedule  for  major   processing   plants   and
streamline reporting requirements.  [Assoc Press]

Hatchery  Coho  Lawsuit.   On  Mar.   4,  1997, federal and state
managers   agreed   to   release    an   additional   1   million
hatchery-reared juvenile coho salmon in the Columbia River  above
Bonneville  Dam to resolve a lawsuit brought by 4 Tribes.  [Assoc
Press, Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce via Greenwire]

BC Steelhead Trout Closure.   On  Mar.  3, 1997, British Columbia
officials announced the emergency closure of 6  Vancouver  Island
drainages  to  sport  fishing  for  steelhead  trout  due  to low
abundance.   Closures  will  extend  through  May  31  to protect
spawning fish, with the maximum  fine  of  $100,000  for  fishing
during the closure.  [Assoc Press]

Health  Sea  Reorganization.   In  late February 1997, Health Sea
(Juneau, AK)  released  two  executives  and  laid  off  about 30
employees at its  Arlington,  WA  plant  as  it  reorganized  and
reduced  emphasis  on mainstream grocery marketing of value-added
salmon products.  Most  corporate  operations  will be moved from
Juneau to Kake, AK, a new company called Kake  Foods  Inc.   will
assume  administrative  functions, and emphasis will be placed on
marketing  value-added  salmon  products  in  gourmet  shops  and
through catalogs.  [Assoc Press]

Aquaculture and Aquaria

Chinese Crawfish Antidumping  Decision.   On  Mar.  20, 1997, the
U.S.   Dept.   of  Commerce  preliminarily  ruled  that   Chinese
crawfish tails are being illegally dumped on the U.S.  market for
less than their fair market value.

A  preliminary  tariff  adjustment to raise the price of imported
crawfish on the U.S.  market would remain in effect until a final
determination is issued on June 2, 1997.  [Assoc Press]

AL Oyster Farmer Assistance.   On  Mar.   11,  1997, about 380 AL
oyster farmers participated in a waterway trash cleanup  program,
developed   to   provide   assistance  to  oyster  farmers  whose
livelihood has been disrupted by state harvesting bans.  Funds to
pay oyster farmers were provided by a grant from the AL Dept.  of
Economic and Community Affairs.  [Assoc Press]

Clayoquot Sound Salmon Farm Vandalism.  On Mar.  9, 1997, vandals
cuts nets at a Clayoquot Sound salmon farm near Tofino, BC, owned
and operated by  Pacific  National  Group,  releasing  as many as
50,000 juvenile chinook salmon, which are unlikely to survive  in
the  wild.  The harvest value of these fish was projected at more
than C$1.2 million.  Recent  protests  focused on the salmon farm
company's license extension and fears that salmon  farming  could
harm  wild  salmon,  but  an  agreement had been reached in early
March for relocation of the  salmon farm.  [Dow Jones News, Assoc
Press]
....
end of Part 2

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