LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 15.5

Help for FISH-SCI Archives


FISH-SCI Archives

FISH-SCI Archives


View:

Next Message | Previous Message
Next in Topic | Previous in Topic
Next by Same Author | Previous by Same Author
Chronologically | Most Recent First
Proportional Font | Monospaced Font

Options:

Join or Leave FISH-SCI
Reply | Post New Message
Search Archives


Subject: CRS Summary - Part 2/4
From: Aldo-Pier Solari <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Academic forum on fisheries ecology and related topics <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Fri, 23 May 1997 20:49:33 GMT
Content-Type:text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
Parts/Attachments

text/plain (330 lines)


From: Kate Wing <[log in to unmask]>


Sharks.  On Apr.  22,  1997,  the  VA Marine Resources Commission
voted to prohibit the commercial landing of sharks less  than  58
inches  in  length.   On  May  2, 1997, a coalition of commercial
fishermen filed suit  against  the  U.S.   Dept.   of Commerce in
federal District Court, arguing that catch  limits  for  Atlantic
sharks  are  arbitrary  and  capricious  and contending that NMFS
violated its  regulatory  procedures.   {On  May  14,  1997, NMFS
announced that the commercial quota for  large  coastal  Atlantic
sharks  for  the season beginning July 1, 1997, was being reduced
from 642  metric  tons  to  326  metric  tons  to  compensate for
overharvesting BY 316 METRIC TONS during the first six months  of
the year.} [NMFS press release, Assoc Press]

French  Port Blockade.  On Apr.  22, 1997, French fishing vessels
blockaded the French ports of Calais, Boulogne, and Dunkirk, in a
protest of EU  regulations  increasing  mesh  size for fixed sole
nets from 80 mm to 120 mm in Jan.  1998.  On Apr.   23,  1997,  a
French  court  ordered  the  fishermen to lift the blockade.  The
fishermen complied on Apr.   24,  after French officials promised
to raise fishermen's concerns at a June 17 EU ministers'  meeting
and   negotiated  for  shipping  companies  to  drop  claims  for
compensation from the fishermen  for  losses during the blockade.
[Dow Jones News, Reuters]

Navy Pays for Coral Reef Damage.  On Apr.  22, 1997, the FL Dept.
of Environmental Protection signed a  settlement  agreement  with
the U.S.  Navy, whereby the Navy will pay FL $750,000 to settle a
$2  million lawsuit over coral reef damage by a nuclear submarine
on Feb.  25, 1993, near Hollywood, FL.  [Assoc Press]

Japan-China Fishery Agreement.   On  Apr.   21-22, 1997, Japanese
and Chinese negotiators conducted working-level discussions on  a
new  provisional bilateral fishery agreement.  Negotiators agreed
to  consider  a  fishery  agreement  separately  from territorial
disputes.  Negotiators will resume discussions  in  May  1997  in
Beijing,  with the objective of concluding an agreement by summer
1997.  [Dow Jones News]

New England Groundfish.  On Apr.   21,  1997, the U.S.  Dept.  of
Commerce/NOAA charged 2 New Bedford, MA, seafood  companies  with
113  violations  for  illegally buying and selling groundfish and
scallops  over  an  18-month  period.   NOAA  alleges  that false
reporting permitted vessels to fish longer than  allowed  and  to
land  more  fish than permitted.  NOAA is seeking $4.7 million in
civil penalties and revocation  of  dealer  permits held by the 2
companies.  On May 3, 1997, the  U.S.   Coast  Guard  seized  the
catch from 2 vessels found fishing in closed waters off Cape Cod,
MA.  [Assoc Press, NOAA press release]

AK IFQ Case.  On Apr.  21, 1997, the U.S.  Supreme Court denied a
hearing  on  the lawsuit of the Alliance Against IFQs (individual
fishing quotas) against  the  U.S.   Dept.   of  Commerce and the
North Pacific Fishery Management Council,  wherein  the  Alliance
argued   that   the  federal  quota  system  unfairly  eliminated
fishermen  from  AK's  halibut  and  blackcod  fisheries.  [Assoc
Press]

Salmon Along the Pacific Coast

{TRIBES ABANDON SALMON POLICY REVIEW PROCESS.  ON MAY  15,  1997,
THE   YAKAMA,  WARM  SPRINGS,  UMATILLA,  AND  NEZ  PERCE  TRIBES
ANNOUNCED THAT THEY NO LONGER  WOULD PARTICIPATE IN THE EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE  FORMED  TO  CONSIDER  DISPUTE  RESOLUTION   CONCERNING
FEDERAL SALMON RESTORATION POLICY.  THE TRIBES EXPRESSED CONCERNS
THAT   FEDERAL   POLICY   DECISIONS   APPEARED  TO  GIVE  LIMITED
CONSIDERATION TO  THE  TRIBES'  POSITION  ON  THE ISSUES.} [ASSOC
PRESS]

{License Plates for  Salmon.   On  May  9,  1997,  the  OR  House
Transportation  Committee approved a license plate design showing
a salmon, with a portion of  the  funds from plate purchase to be
dedicated to salmon restoration.} [Assoc Press]

Umpqua  River  Cutthroat  Trout  Lawsuit.   On  May  7,  1997,  a
coalition of fishing and environmental groups filed a lawsuit  in
U.S.   District  Court  (Portland,  OR)  against the U.S.  Forest
Service, Bureau of Land  Management, and NMFS, challenging NMFS's
opinion that the Northwest forest plan was  adequate  to  protect
endangered  Umpqua  River  cutthroat  trout.   The plaintiffs are
asking for  specific  measures  to  better  protect this species.
[Assoc Press]

Nitrogen Supersaturation.  In early May 1997, nitrogen saturation
levels were reported to have reached 140% below John Day  Dam  on
the  Columbia  River  and  128% below Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake
River.  [Assoc Press]

Canadian Salmon Fishery.  On May  2,  1997, BC Premier Glen Clark
released  a  38-page  discussion  paper   calling   for   renewed
discussion  with  the federal government to reduce duplication of
government services and outlining a sport fishing proposal with 3
goals for fisheries -- 1)  protection of fish stocks and habitat,
2) creating sustainable fishery jobs and stable communities,  and
3)  enhancing  BC's role in fisheries solutions.  On May 5, 1997,
BC Premier  Glen  Clark  announced  a  C$1.5  million  grant to a
Community Fisheries Development Centre to  select  and  manage  a
range  of  community-based  fisheries initiatives over 3 years to
support  displaced  fishery  workers   and  fund  salmon  habitat
restoration work.  [Assoc Press]

Bristol Bay Price-Fixing Suit.   On  May  2,  1997,  two  seafood
processors  agreed  to pay $2 million to settle a 1995 $1 billion
class-action lawsuit  alleging  price-fixing  in  the Bristol Bay
salmon fishery from  1989  through  1995.   Although  14  smaller
processors  previously  settled  for  about  $500,000,  about  40
defendants remain.  [Assoc Press]

Salmon  Habitat  Restoration.   The  May  1997 issue of Fisheries
published the  results  of  a  study  by  three Pacific Northwest
fishery  scientists  concluding  that   few   in-stream   habitat
enhancement  projects  have resulted in any long-term success for
the  fish.   To  succeed,  such  efforts  must  be  combined with
restoration of ecological processes within  an  entire  watershed
including  modification of upslope and riparian conditions, these
individuals suggest.  [Fisheries]

ESA Listing of Coho  Salmon.   On  Apr.  25, 1997, NMFS announced
that northern CA and southern OR coho salmon would be  listed  as
"threatened"  while  northern  and central OR coastal coho salmon
would not be listed in  response  to the state of OR's negotiated
recovery plan, but identified as a "candidate" species for future
consideration.   On  Apr.   30,   1997,   a   coalition   of   25
environmental  and  sport/commercial  fishermen's groups notified
NMFS that they intend to file suit on the decision not to list OR
coastal coho salmon  under  the  Endangered  Species Act.  [Assoc
Press, Reuters]

Pacific Salmon Treaty.  On Apr.  25, 1997, talks  among  Canadian
and  U.S.   fishermen  and  fishing  industry  representatives in
Juneau, AK, ended with  negotiators  agreeing to consider setting
catch quotas for two southern southeast AK salmon fisheries  (one
seine and one gillnet) using "abundance-based management" wherein
harvest  would  reflect  increases or decreases in pink, sockeye,
and  chum   salmon   populations.    Additional  discussions  are
scheduled for May 5-9, 1997, in Vancouver, BC.  {On May 9,  1997,
discussions  among  stakeholders  broke down amid reports of some
progress on southeast  AK  seine  and  gillnet fisheries.  Treaty
negotiators are scheduled to meet on May 20-21, 1997, in Seattle,
WA.} [Assoc Press]

Columbia River  Spring  Chinook.   In  late  April  1997,  state,
federal,  and tribal biologists increased their projection of the
1997 Columbia-Snake River spring  chinook  salmon run from 68,000
to 90,000 fish, after almost 55,000 spring chinook  were  counted
passing Bonneville Dam as of Apr.  25, 1997.  On May 8, 1997, the
ID  Fish and Game Commission approved a sport fishery on hatchery
spring chinook in  the  Little  Salmon  (400 fish) and Clearwater
(500 fish) Rivers beginning May 17 to possibly as long as July 6,
based upon increased adult returns.  This is the  first  hatchery
spring  chinook  fishery  in  ID since 1993, but it is subject to
approval by NMFS.  [Assoc Press]

Fishing Community Diversification.  On  Apr.  24, 1997, officials
of the Ford Foundation announced a $2 million grant to create the
nation's  first  bank  holding  company  dedicated  to  promoting
environmentally sound economic  development,  including  economic
diversification  in  coastal  communities  suffering  from salmon
season closures.  The conservation  group Ecotrust (Portland, OR)
will join with the Shore Bank Corp.  (Chicago, IL)  to  form  the
new  holding  company.   The holding company will offer loans for
conservation-based  development   in   coastal  communities  from
northern CA through Prince William Sound, AK.  [Assoc Press]

AK Fishing Guides.  On Apr.   23,  1997,  the  Kenai  River  (AK)
Special  Management  Area  Advisory  Committee held a hearing and
received testimony  on  whether  to  limit  the  number  of sport
fishing guides on the river, charge guides higher  license  fees,
conduct  a study of overcrowding in the river's sport fishery, or
take other action.  On Apr.   30,  1997,  the AK House approved a
bill that would authorize the state to regulate and license sport
fishing guides.  [Assoc Press]

Clinton Administration Western Land Management Strategy.  On Apr.
23, 1997,  officials  of  the  Clinton  Administration  announced
details   of   a  draft  $125  million-per-year  land  management
strategy, prepared  by  the  Forest  Service  and  Bureau of Land
Management, to increase logging, create jobs, and better  protect
fish  in  7  western  states.  Land use restrictions near streams
inhabited by fish  on  more  than  72  million  acres of national
forest and other public lands would be broadened.  This  strategy
was  the  preferred  alternative  in a draft environmental impact
statement for the  Interior  Columbia  Basin Ecosystem Management
Project.  The draft strategy now begins a 120-day public  comment
period.   {ON  MAY  15,  1997,  THE  SENATE  ENERGY  AND  NATURAL
RESOURCES SUBCOMMITTEE ON FORESTS AND PUBLIC LAND MANAGEMENT HELD
A  JOINT HEARING WITH THE HOUSE RESOURCES SUBCOMMITTEE ON FORESTS
AND  FOREST   HEALTH   TO   REVIEW   THE   COLUMBIA  RIVER  BASIN
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT.} [Assoc Press, Reuters]

Aquaculture and Aquaria

{SC Shrimp Virus.  In early May 1997, two SC scientists  reported
to  the  SC Marine Advisory Committee that a virus similar to the
Asian white spot virus is  present  in many SC marine species and
widespread along the SC coast.  Scientists are having  difficulty
determining whether mortalities at shrimp farms are caused by the
Asian white spot virus or the similar virus.} [Assoc Press]

Freshwater Fisheries

Sikes  Act  Hearing.   On  May  22,  1997,  the  House  Resources
Subcommittee  on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife, and Oceans has
tentatively scheduled a joint hearing with the House Committee on
National Security on H.R.  374,  proposing to amend the Sikes Act
to enhance fish and wildlife conservation  and  natural  resource
management   programs   on   military  installations.   [personal
communication]

Red Lakes Commercial Fishery.   On  Apr.   19, 1997, the Red Lake
Band of Chippewa Fisheries Association voted to cancel  its  1997
commercial  fishing  season  on  Upper  and  Lower Red Lakes, MN,
because of  declining  walleye,  perch,  and crappie populations.
The Red Lakes fishery is reported to be the only commercial  U.S.
walleye fishery and largest Tribal fishery on the continent; this
is  the  first  closure since 1929 when the Band began exercising
Treaty fishing rights.  [Assoc Press]

Marine Mammals

{Hawaiian Whale Sanctuary.   June  6,  1997,  is  the deadline by
which HI Governor Ben Cayetano must decide how much, if any, of a
proposed 1,680 square miles of state waters and  submerged  lands
should  be  included  within  the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale
National  Marine  Sanctuary   and   managed   under  its  federal
management plan.} [Assoc Press]

Norwegian  Whaling.   A  Dutch  court  hearing  on  the  possible
extradition of Paul Watson to Norway is tentatively scheduled for
May 26, 1997.  Lofoten Islands police have announced  that  legal
proceedings  in Lofoten County Court are scheduled against Watson
in Norway  on  Sept.   1,  1997,  relating  to  alleged negligent
navigation and collision with a Norwegian coast guard  vessel  in
the  summer  of  1994.  Compensation for damages of $120,000 with
possible interest  is  sought  by  the  Norwegian  Navy  for this
collision.  On May 2, 1997,  Norway  began  its  1997  commercial
minke whale hunt for a quota of 580 animals.  The season will end
on July 21, 1997.  Individual vessels are limited to six weeks of
whaling,  when  an inspector is aboard.  [Assoc Press, High North
Alliance News]

{WHALEMEAT  SMUGGLING  REPORT.   ON  MAY  15,  1997,  THE BRITISH
TRAFFIC NETWORK RELEASED A REPORT ENTITLED "WHALE MEAT  TRADE  IN
EAST  ASIA,"  WHICH REPORTED THAT WHALEMEAT IS SMUGGLED ILLEGALLY
FROM JAPAN AND AVAILABLE ON  THE MENUS OF NUMEROUS RESTAURANTS IN
HONG KONG.} [DOW JONES NEWS]

{CA SEA LION DEATHS.  ON MAY  14-15,  1997,  MEXICAN  AUTHORITIES
REPORTED  FINDING  THE  CARCASSES  OF 14 CA SEAL LIONS ON BEACHES
JUST SOUTH OF THE U.S.-MEXICAN  BORDER.  THE ANIMALS WERE CLUBBED
OR SHOT AND COULD HAVE DRIFTED SOUTH FROM U.S.  WATERS.   EARLIER
THIS  MONTH,  5  SEA  LION CARCASSES WASHED ASHORE IN THE TIJUANA
SLOUGH NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE,  JUST  NORTH OF THE U.S.-MEXICAN
BORDER.} [ASSOC PRESS]

Tuna-Dolphin Legislation.  {On May 14, 1997, the Senate  Commerce
Subcommittee  on  Oceans  and Fisheries held a} hearing on S. 39,
amendments to the Marine  Mammal  Protection  Act relating to the
International Dolphin Conservation Program.  {H.R.  408 HAS  BEEN
TENTATIVELY  SCHEDULED FOR CONSIDERATION BY THE FULL HOUSE DURING
THE  WEEK  OF   MAY   19,   1997.}  [Federal  Register,  PERSONAL
COMMUNICATION]

{CITES  Downlisting  of  Certain  Whales.   In  early  May  1997,
Norwegian sources reported that the Convention  on  International
Trade  in  Endangered  Species  of  Wild  Fauna and Flora (CITES)
Secretariat had recommended that  5 proposals to downlist various
whale stocks (minke whales in the  northeast  and  central  north
Atlantic,  Southern  Hemisphere,  and  Okhotsk  Sea-West Pacific;
eastern Pacific grey  whales;  northwest  Pacific Bryde's whales)
from Appendix I to Appendix II be accepted with  a  zero  harvest
quota,  based  on  these populations not meeting the criteria for
inclusion on Appendix I. Downlisting  to Appendix II could permit
controlled international trade in these species' products only if
a 1979 CITES resolution recommending  no  permits  for  trade  in
whale  products protected by the International Whaling Commission
were repealed.   Japan  has  proposed  to  appeal  the 1979 CITES
resolution.} [High North Alliance News]

Keiko's  Recovery.   On  May  6,  1997,  the  Free  Willy   Keiko
Foundation  announced  that,  by spring 1997, Keiko could be in a
fenced-off pen in  the  North  Atlantic  as  the next step toward
release to the wild.  Details of cost  and  potential  sites  are
under research and negotiation.  [Assoc Press]

Japanese  Scientific  Whaling.   On  May  1,  1997,  a fleet of 4
Japanese ships departed  for  the  northwestern  Pacific with the
objective of killing as many as 100  minke  whales  for  research
purposes.   Research  is  scheduled to be completed by the end of
July  1997.   {On  May  12-16,  1997,  the  International Whaling
Commission's Scientific Committee is meeting behind closed  doors
in  Tokyo,  Japan,  to review Japan's scientific whaling program.
Results of this  review  will  be  presented  at the IWC's annual
meeting in Monaco in October 1997.} [Dow Jones News, Reuters]

Steller Sea Lion Listed as Endangered.  On Apr.  30,  1997,  NMFS
announced  that  it  will  list the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea
population of Steller sea lion as "endangered," as the population
continues to  decline  between  5%  and  7%  annually.   A second
distinct, but stable,  population  of  Steller  sea  lions,  from
southeast  AK  through CA remains listed as "threatened." NMFS is
planning a workshop to design  an experiment on assessing whether
fishing area closures might benefit  Steller  sea  lions  without
unnecessarily  restricting  commercial  fishing.  [Reuters, Assoc
Press, NOAA press release]

Polar  Bear  Trophies.   The  House  Resources  Committee  held a
hearing on Apr.  30, 1997, on H.J.Res.  59, a joint resolution to
disapprove a rule affecting applications  to  import  polar  bear
trophies  from  Canada  issued  by  the  U.S.   Fish and Wildlife
Service (FWS).  On  Apr.   25,  1997,  FWS  announced that it had
approved 24 permits to import polar bear  trophies  from  Canada.
Five  Canadian  polar  bear  populations  have been approved from
which trophy bears can be imported.  [personal communication, FWS
press release]

Atlantic Large Whale Protection.   On  Apr.  26, 1997, the Senate
Commerce Subcommittee  on  Oceans  and  Fisheries  held  a  field
hearing  in  Portland,  ME,  on  the  proposed regulations.  Four
public hearings will be held from  Apr.  30-May 3 on fishing gear
modification  regulations;  additional  public  comment  will  be
received until May 15, 1997.   On  May  7,  1997,  MA  Dept.   of
Environmental  Affairs  officials  lifted  an  emergency  ban  on
fishing  gear  aimed  at  protecting  northern right whales since
these whales appear to have  left MA waters several weeks earlier
than normal this year.  [Assoc Press, Federal Register]
....
End of Part 2/4

Back to: Top of Message | Previous Page | Main FISH-SCI Page

Permalink



LISTSRV.NORDU.NET

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager